Zarządzanie zespołem – co wynika z podpatrywania czołowych dyrygentów? (ted#3)

Dziś kolejna ciekawa prezentacja zaczerpnięta z konferencji TED-a. Itay Talgam, izraelski doświadczony dyrygent, w interesujący sposób pokazuje kluczowe elementy skutecznego zarządzania zespołem. A robi to biorąc za przykład sposób, w jaki dyrygenci kierują zespołem muzyków podczas koncerty symfonicznego. Jego obserwacje są niebanalne, inspirujące, prowokujące do przemyśleń.

Poniżej materiały dla tych, których zaciekawiła opisana powyżej prezentacja. Słuchanie (i oglądanie) prezentacji połączyć można z odświeżeniem swojej znajomości języka angielskiego. Wybrać przy tym można jedną z następujących opcji (podaję od najtrudniejszej do najłatwiejszej):

  • wysłuchanie i obejrzenie prezentacji w języku angielskim, bez napisów
  • wysłuchanie i obejrzenie prezentacji z napisami angielskimi
  • przejrzenie poniżej podanego skryptu z wyjaśnionymi po polsku trudniejszymi słówkami, a następnie wysłuchanie i obejrzenie prezentacji z napisami angielskimi
  • wysłuchanie i obejrzenie prezentacji z napisami w języku polskim

Ta ostatnia opcja oczywiście nie daje korzyści językowych, a jedynie korzyść merytoryczną.

Dodatkowo, w punkcie (2) poniżej podano około 10 pytań po angielsku, typu TRUE/FALSE, umożliwiających weryfikację zrozumienia tekstu, a także (w punkcie 3) kilka pytań otwartych. odpowiedzi do pytań TRUE/FALSE z punktu (2), są podane w punkcie (6).

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Itay Talgam   “Lead like the great conductors”

Contents:

  1. Author, title, link
  2. TRUE/FALSE questions
  3. Open questions
  4. English script [[[with Polish explanations of selected vocabulary]]]
  5. Polish script
  6. Answers to TRUE/FALSE questions

  

  1. Author, title, link

Itay Talgam,   “Lead like the great conductors”

 

 

2. TRUE/FALSE questions

  1. The conductor podium does not have walls.                    TRUE/FALSE
  2. The speaker believes that the orchestra is playing good music mainly due to the gestures of the conductor.                TRUE/FALSE
  3. Bellydancing took place in Vienna Opera.           TRUE/FALSE
  4. Vienna audience usually coughs a lot.   TRUE/FALSE
  5. Stradivarius is a particular type of a violin.           TRUE/FALSE
  6. In the La Scala theatre, the employees asked the conductor Muti to resign.                     TRUE/FALSE
  7. In the “10 Commandments for Conductors”, the first commandment says that a good conductor should sweat after a successful concert.            TRUE/FALSE
  8. Karajan while conducting clearly indicates the moment when the orchestra should start playing.               TRUE/FALSE
  9. The speaker does not believe that partnership between the conductor and the orchestra is possible.               TRUE/FALSE
  10. It is impossible for a conductor to do his job while having his eyes closed.          TRUE/FALSE

    3. Open questions

  1. What do you think about the different styles of leadership, described in the TED presentation?
  2. Do you see any similarity between different styles of conducting a concert and different styles of running a team in a company?
  3. Which management style would you most eagerly use if you were to run a professional project?
  4. Generally, have you found the talk interesting? Justify your answer.

 

 

4. English script     [[[with Polish translation of selected vocabulary]]]

 

 

The magical moment, the magical moment of conducting [[[dyrygowanie]]]. Which is, you go onto a stage [[[scena]]]. There is an orchestra sitting. They are all, you know, warming up and doing stuff [[[tu: ćwiczą]]]. And I go on the podium. You know, this little office of the conductor. Or rather a cubicle [[[boks, komórka]]], an open-space cubicle, with a lot of space. And in front of all that noise, you do a very small gesture [[[gest]]]. Something like this, not very pomp, not very sophisticated [[[skomplikowany]]], this. And suddenly, out of the chaos, order. Noise becomes music.

00:45

And this is fantastic. And it’s so tempting [[[kuszące]]] to think that it’s all about me [[[dzięki mnie]]]. (Laughter) All those great people here, virtuosos [[[wirtuozi]]], they make noise, they need me to do that. Not really. If it were that, I would just save you the talk, and teach you the gesture. So you could go out to the world and do this thing in whatever company [[[firma]]] or whatever you want, and you have perfect harmony. It doesn’t work. Let’s look at the first video [[[film]]]. I hope you’ll think it’s a good example of harmony [[[harmonia]]]. And then speak a little bit about how it comes about [[[skąd się to bierze]]].

01:17

(Music)

02:13

Was that nice? So that was a sort of a success [[[swego rodzaju sukces]]]. Now, who should we thank [[[dziękować]]] for the success? I mean, obviously the orchestra musicians playing beautifully, the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra. They don’t often even look at the conductor [[[dyrygent]]]. Then you have the clapping [[[klaszczący]]] audience [[[widownia]]], yeah, actually taking part in doing the music. You know Viennese audiences usually don’t interfere [[[nie wtrącać się]]] with the music. This is the closest to an Oriental bellydancing feast [[[święto tańca brzucha]]] that you will ever get in Vienna. (Laughter)

02:47

Unlike, for example Israel, where audiences cough [[[kaszleć]]] all the time. You know, Arthur Rubinstein, the pianist, used to say that, „Anywhere in the world, people that have the flu [[[grypa]]], they go to the doctor. In Tel Aviv they come to my concerts.” (Laughter) So that’s a sort of a tradition. But Viennese audiences do not do that. Here they go out of their regular [[[wychodzić poza swoje typowe zachowanie]]], just to be part of that, to become part of the orchestra, and that’s great. You know, audiences like you, yeah, make the event [[[wydarzenie]]].

03:16

But what about the conductor? What can you say the conductor was doing, actually? Um, he was happy. And I often show this to senior management [[[ludzie na wysokich stanowiskach]]]. People get annoyed [[[być poirytowanym]]]. „You come to work. How come you’re so happy?” Something must be wrong there, yeah? But he’s spreading happiness [[[promienować szczęściem]]]. And I think the happiness, the important thing is this happiness does not come from only his own story and his joy of the music. The joy is about enabling [[[umożliwiać]]] other people’s stories to be heard at the same time.

03:49

You have the story of the orchestra as a professional body [[[profesjonaliści]]]. You have the story of the audience as a community [[[społeczność]]]. Yeah. You have the stories of the individuals [[[poszczególnych ludzi]]] in the orchestra and in the audience. And then you have other stories, unseen [[[niewidzialne]]]. People who build this wonderful concert hall [[[sala koncertowa]]]. People who made those Stradivarius, Amati, all those beautiful instruments. And all those stories are being heard at the same time. This is the true experience of a live concert [[[koncert na żywo]]]. That’s a reason to go out of home. Yeah? And not all conductors do just that. Let’s see somebody else, a great conductor. Riccardo Muti, please.

04:27

(Music)

05:03

Yeah, that was very short, but you could see it’s a completely different figure [[[inna osobowość]]]. Right? He’s awesome [[[niesamowity]]]. He’s so commanding [[[władczy]]]. Yeah? So clear [[[jasne]]]. Maybe a little bit over-clear [[[zbytnio jasne]]]. Can we have a little demonstration [[[próbę]]]? Would you be my orchestra for a second? Can you sing, please, the first note [[[nuta]]] of Don Giovanni? You have to sing „Aaaaaah,” and I’ll stop you. Okay? Ready?

05:24

Audience: ♫ Aaaaaaah … ♫

05:26

Itay Talgam: Come on [[[no dalej]]], with me. If you do it without me I feel even more redundant [[[zbędny]]] than I already feel. So please, wait for the conductor. Now look at me. „Aaaaaah,” and I stop you. Let’s go.

05:37

Audience: ♫ … Aaaaaaaah … ♫ (Laughter)

05:43

Itay Talgam: So we’ll have a little chat later. (Laughter) But … There is a vacancy [[[wolny etat]]] for a … But — (Laughter) — you could see that you could stop an orchestra with a finger [[[palec]]]. Now what does Riccardo Muti do? He does something like this … (Laughter) And then — sort of [[[coś w rodzaju]]]– (Laughter) So not only the instruction [[[polecenie]]] is clear, but also the sanction [[[sankcja, skutek]]], what will happen if you don’t do what I tell you. (Laughter) So, does it work? Yes, it works — to a certain point.

06:21

When Muti is asked, „Why do you conduct like this?” He says, „I’m responsible.” [[[odpowiedzialny]]] Responsible in front of him. No he doesn’t really mean Him. He means Mozart, which is — (Laughter) — like a third seat [[[krzesło]]] from the center. (Laughter) So he says, „If I’m — (Applause) if I’m responsible for Mozart, this is going to be the only story to be told. It’s Mozart as I, Riccardo Muti, understand it.”

06:46

And you know what happened to Muti? Three years ago he got a letter signed by all 700 employees [[[pracownicy]]] of La Scala, musical employees, I mean the musicians [[[muzycy]]], saying, „You’re a great conductor. We don’t want to work with you. Please resign [[[złóż wymówienie]]].” (Laughter) „Why? Because you don’t let us develop [[[rozwijać się]]]. You’re using us as instruments, not as partners. And our joy [[[radość]]] of music, etc., etc. …” So he had to resign. Isn’t that nice? (Laughter) He’s a nice guy [[[fajny facet]]]. He’s a really nice guy. Well, can you do it with less control, or with a different kind of control? Let’s look at the next conductor, Richard Strauss.

07:26

(Music)

07:54

I’m afraid you’ll get the feeling that I really picked on [[[wybrać kogoś]]] him because he’s old. It’s not true. When he was a young man of about 30, he wrote what he called „The Ten Commandments [[[10 przykazań]]] for Conductors.” The first one was: If you sweat [[[pocisz się]]] by the end of the concert it means that you must have done something wrong. That’s the first one. The fourth one you’ll like better. It says: Never look at the trombones [[[puzoniści]]] — it only encourages them. (Laughter)

08:21

So, the whole idea is really to let it happen by itself [[[żeby wszystko samo się działo]]]. Do not interfere [[[nie wtrącać się]]]. But how does it happen? Did you see him turning pages [[[przerwacać strony]]] in the score [[[partytura]]]? Now, either he is senile [[[zniedołężniały]]], and doesn’t remember his own music, because he wrote the music. Or he is actually transferring [[[wysyłać]]] a very strong message to them, saying, „Come on guys. You have to play by the book [[[tu: grać według nut]]]. So it’s not about my story. It’s not about your story. It’s only the execution of the written music, no interpretation [[[interpretacja]]].” Interpretation is the real story of the performer [[[wykonawca]]]. So, no, he doesn’t want that. That’s a different kind of control. Let’s see another super-conductor, a German super-conductor. Herbert von Karajan, please.

09:03

(Music)

09:36

What’s different? Did you see the eyes? Closed. Did you see the hands? Did you see this kind of movement? Let me conduct you. Twice. Once like a Muti, and you’ll — (Claps) — clap, just once. And then like Karajan. Let’s see what happens. Okay? Like Muti. You ready? Because Muti … (Laughter) Okay? Ready? Let’s do it.

09:55

Audience: (Claps)

09:56

Itay Talgam: Hmm … again.

09:58

Audience: (Claps) Itay Talgam: Good. Now like a Karajan. Since you’re already trained, let me concentrate, close my eyes. Come, come.

10:07

Audience: (Claps) (Laughter)

10:09

Itay Talgam: Why not together? (Laughter) Because you didn’t know when to play. Now I can tell you, even the Berlin Philharmonic doesn’t know when to play. (Laughter) But I’ll tell you how they do it. No cynicism [[[bez cynizmu]]]. This is a German orchestra, yes? They look at Karajan. And then they look at each other. (Laughter) „Do you understand what this guy wants?” And after doing that, they really look at each other, and the first players of the orchestra lead [[[prowadzą]]] the whole ensemble in playing together.

10:39

And when Karajan is asked about it he actually says, „Yes, the worst damage [[[krzywda]]] I can do to my orchestra is to give them a clear instruction. Because that would prevent the ensemble, the listening to each other that is needed for an orchestra.” Now that’s great. What about the eyes? Why are the eyes closed? There is a wonderful story about Karajan conducting in London. And he cues in a flute player [[[flecista]]] like this. The guy has no idea what to do. (Laughter) „Maestro, with all due respect, when should I start?” What do you think Karajan’s reply was? When should I start? Oh yeah. He says, „You start when you can’t stand it anymore. [[[kiedy już dłużej nie możesz wytrzymać]]]” (Laughter)

11:24

Meaning that you know you have no authority [[[nie masz prawa]]] to change anything. It’s my music. The real music is only in Karajan’s head. And you have to guess [[[zgadnąć]]] my mind [[[myśli]]]. So you are under tremendous [[[ogromna]]] pressure [[[presja]]] because I don’t give you instruction, and yet, you have to guess my mind. So it’s a different kind of, a very spiritual [[[duchowa]]] but yet very firm [[[mocna]]] control. Can we do it in another way? Of course we can. Let’s go back to the first conductor we’ve seen: Carlos Kleiber, his name. Next video, please.

11:53

(Music)

12:49

(Laughter) Yeah. Well, it is different. But isn’t that controlling [[[kontrolowanie]]] in the same way? No, it’s not, because he is not telling them what to do. When he does this, it’s not, „Take your Stradivarius [[[skrzypce Stradivariusa]]] and like Jimi Hendrix, smash [[[rozbić]]] it on the floor.” It’s not that. He says, „This is the gesture of the music. I’m opening a space for you to put in another layer [[[warstwa]]] of interpretation.” That is another story.

13:14

But how does it really work together if it doesn’t give them instructions? It’s like being on a rollercoaster [[[rollercoaster]]]. Yeah? You’re not really given any instructions, but the forces of the process [[[siły samego procesu]]] itself keep you in place. That’s what he does. The interesting thing is of course the rollercoaster does not really exist. It’s not a physical thing. It’s in the players’ heads.

13:34

And that’s what makes them into partners. You have the plan in your head. You know what to do, even though Kleiber is not conducting you. But here and there and that. You know what to do. And you become a partner building the rollercoaster, yeah, with sound, as you actually take the ride [[[wsiadać na przejażdżkę]]]. This is very exciting for those players. They do need to go to a sanatorium for two weeks, later. (Laughter) It is very tiring [[[męczący]]]. Yeah? But it’s the best music making, like this.

14:04

But of course it’s not only about motivation and giving them a lot of physical energy. You also have to be very professional. And look again at this Kleiber. Can we have the next video, quickly? You’ll see what happens when there is a mistake.

14:20

(Music) Again you see the beautiful body language. (Music) And now there is a trumpet player [[[trębacz]]] who does something not exactly the way it should be done. Go along with the video. Look. See, second time for the same player. (Laughter) And now the third time for the same player. (Laughter) „Wait for me after the concert. I have a short notice to give you.” You know, when it’s needed, the authority [[[włądza]]] is there. It’s very important. But authority is not enough to make people your partners.

15:04

Let’s see the next video, please. See what happens here. You might be surprised having seen Kleiber as such a hyperactive guy [[[hiperaktywny facet]]]. He’s conducting Mozart. (Music) The whole orchestra is playing. (Music) Now something else. (Music) See? He is there 100 percent, but not commanding, not telling what to do. Rather enjoying what the soloist [[[solista]]] is doing. (Music)

15:44

Another solo now. See what you can pick up [[[wyłapać]]] from this. (Music) Look at the eyes. Okay. You see that? First of all, it’s a kind of a compliment [[[komplement]]] we all like to get. It’s not feedback [[[opinia]]]. It’s an „Mmmm …” Yeah, it comes from here. So that’s a good thing. And the second thing is it’s about actually being in control, but in a very special way. When Kleiber does — did you see the eyes, going from here? (Singing) You know what happens? Gravitation [[[grawitacja]]] is no more.

16:24

Kleiber not only creates a process, but also creates the conditions [[[warunki]]] in the world in which this process takes place. So again, the oboe player [[[oboista]]] is completely autonomous [[[autonomiczny]]] and therefore happy and proud [[[dumny]]] of his work, and creative and all of that. And the level [[[poziom]]] in which Kleiber is in control is in a different level. So control is no longer a zero-sum game [[[gra o sumie zerowej]]]. You have this control. You have this control. And all you put together, in partnership, brings about the best music. So Kleiber is about process. Kleiber is about conditions in the world.

16:58

But you need to have process and content [[[treść]]] to create the meaning [[[znaczenie]]]. Lenny Bernstein, my own personal maestro. Since he was a great teacher, Lenny Bernstein always started from the meaning. Look at this, please.

17:13

(Music)

18:12

Do you remember the face of Muti, at the beginning? Well he had a wonderful expression [[[wyraz twarzy]]], but only one. (Laughter) Did you see Lenny’s face? You know why? Because the meaning of the music is pain [[[ból]]]. And you’re playing a painful [[[bolesny]]] sound. And you look at Lenny and he’s suffering [[[cierpieć]]]. But not in a way that you want to stop. It’s suffering, like, enjoying himself in a Jewish way, as they say. (Laughter) But you can see the music on his face. You can see the baton [[[batuta]]] left his hand. No more baton. Now it’s about you, the player, telling the story. Now it’s a reversed thing [[[odwrotna rzecz]]]. You’re telling the story. And you’re telling the story. And even briefly [[[na chwilę]]], you become the storyteller [[[opowiadacz]]] to which the community, the whole community, listens to. And Bernstein enables [[[umożliwiać]]] that. Isn’t that wonderful?

19:01

Now, if you are doing all the things we talked about, together, and maybe some others, you can get to this wonderful point of doing without doing. And for the last video, I think this is simply the best title. My friend Peter says, „If you love something, give it away [[[podzielić się czymś]]].” So, please.

19:21

(Music)

20:25

(Applause)

 

5. Polish script

 

Magiczna chwila, magiczna chwila dyrygowania. To kiedy wchodzisz na scenę, jest tam siedząca orkiestra. Wszyscy tak, no wiecie, rozgrzewają się, stroją i tak dalej. Wchodzę wtedy na podium. Rozumiecie, małe biuro dyrygenta. Albo raczej boks, bez ścianek, z duża ilością przestrzeni. I naprzeciw całego tego hałasu, robisz malutki gest. Coś takiego – niezbyt wyszukanego, niezbyt napuszonego, o „tak”. I nagle, z chaosu wyłania się porządek. Hałas staje się muzyką.

00:45

I to jest fantastyczne. I bardzo kuszące, pomyśleć, że to wszystko dzięki mnie. (Śmiech) Wszyscy ci wspaniali ludzie, wirtuozi, hałasują, potrzebują, żebym zrobił „tak”. Wcale nie. Gdyby to na tym polegało, oszczędziłbym wam wykładu, a nauczył gestu. Moglibyście wtedy iść w świat, zrobić „tak” w jakiejkolwiek firmie, czy gdziekolwiek chcecie i osiągnąć idealną harmonię. To nie działa. Spójrzmy na pierwszy film. Mam nadzieję, że uznacie to za dobry przykład harmonii, a potem powiem parę słów, o tym, skąd się to bierze.

01:17

(Muzyka)

02:13

Podobało Wam się? A więc był to swego rodzaju sukces. Ale komu powinniśmy podziękować za ten sukces? To znaczy, oczywiście, muzykom, którzy tak pięknie grają, Filharmonicy Wiedeńscy. Właściwie nawet nie patrzą na dyrygenta. Jest jeszcze klaszcząca publiczność, faktycznie biorąca udział w tworzeniu muzyki. Wiecie, wiedeńska publiczność zwykle nie wtrąca się do muzyki. To najbliższe do orientalnego tańca brzucha, czego kiedykolwiek możecie doświadczyć w Wiedniu. (Śmiech)

02:47

W odróżnieniu od, na przykład, Izraela, gdzie publiczność cały czas kaszle. Wiecie, Artur Rubinstein, pianista, zwykł mawiać, że „Gdziekolwiek na świecie, kiedy ludzie mają grypę, idą do lekarza. W Tel Awiwie przychodzą na moje koncerty.” (Śmiech) To rodzaj tradycji. Ale wiedeńska publiczność tego nie robi. Tutaj, wychodzą poza swoje zwykłe zachowanie, aby stać się częścią tego, aby stać się częścią orkiestry, i to jest wspaniałe. Wiecie, publiczność taka jak wy, współtworzy wydarzenie.

03:16

Ale co z dyrygentem? Jak możecie określić to, co tak naprawdę robił dyrygent? Był szczęśliwy. Często pokazuję to ludziom na wysokich stanowiskach. Denerwują się wtedy. „Przychodzisz do pracy. Jak możesz być taki szczęśliwy?” Coś tu musi być nie tak, prawda? Ale on promieniuje szczęściem. I myślę, że to szczęście, co jest ważne, to szczęście nie pochodzi tylko z jego własnej historii, albo z jego radości muzyki. Radość bierze się z umożliwienia historiom innych ludzi, aby były słyszane w tym samym momencie.

03:49

Jest historia orkiestry, jako profesjonalistów. Jest historia publiczności, jako społeczności. Są historie pojedynczych ludzi, z orkiestry i z publiczności. I są jeszcze inne historie, niewidzialne. Ludzi, którzy zbudowali tę wspaniałą salę koncertową. Ludzi, którzy stworzyli te Stradivariusy, Amati, wszystkie te piękne instrumenty. I wszystkie te historie są słyszalne w tym samym momencie. To jest prawdziwe doświadczenie koncertu na żywo. To jest powód, żeby wyjść z domu, nieprawdaż? Ale nie wszyscy dyrygenci robią tylko to. Obejrzyjmy kogoś innego, wielkiego dyrygenta, Ricardo Muti, proszę.

04:27

(Muzyka)

05:03

Tak, to było bardzo krótkie. Ale mogliście zobaczyć, to zupełnie inna osobowość, prawda? Jest niesamowity. Jest taki władczy, prawda? Aby wszystko było jasne, nawet zbytnio jasne. Zrobimy może małą prezentację? Czy będziecie przez chwilkę moją orkiestrą? Czy możecie, proszę, zaśpiewać pierwszą nutę z „Don Giovanniego”? Musicie śpiewać „Aaaaaaa”, a ja was zatrzymam. W porządku? Gotowi?

05:24

Publiczność: ♫ Aaaaaa… ♫

05:26

Itay Talgam: No dalej, ze mną. Jeśli robicie to beze mnie, czuję się jeszcze bardziej zbędny niż wcześniej. Więc proszę, poczekajcie na dyrygenta. Teraz spójrzcie na mnie. „Aaaaaaa”, i was zatrzymam. Zaczynamy.

05:37

Publiczność: ♫ Aaaaaa… ♫ Śmiech

05:43

Itay Talgam: My utniemy sobie pogawędkę później. (Śmiech) Ale… Jest etat dla… Ale — (Śmiech) — widzieliście, że można zatrzymać orkiestrę jednym palcem. A co robi Ricardo Muti? Robi coś takiego… (Śmiech) I wtedy — coś w rodzaju — (Śmiech) Więc nie tylko polecenie jest jasne, ale też skutek, co się stanie, jeśli nie zrobicie tego, co wam każę. (Śmiech) Więc, czy to działa? Owszem, działa — do pewnego momentu.

06:21

Kiedy pyta się Mutiego, „Czemu dyrygujesz w ten sposób?’, odpowiada, „Jestem odpowiedzialny.” Odpowiedzialny przed nim. Nie, tak naprawde nie ma na myśli Niego. Ma na myśli Mozarta, który — (Śmiech) — siedzi jakieś trzy miejsca od środka. (Śmiech) Więc mówi, „Jeśli jestem — (Oklaski) Jeśli jestem odpowiedzialny przed Mozartem, to będzie jedyna opowiedziana historia. To Mozart taki, jakim ja, Ricardo Muti rozumie go.”

06:46

I wiecie, co się stało z Mutim? Trzy lata temu dostał list, podpisany przez wszystkich 700 pracowników La Scali, muzycznych pracowników, mam na myśli muzyków, list mówiący: „Jesteś wielkim dyrygentem. Nie chcemy z Tobą pracować. Prosimy, złóż wymówienie.” (Śmiech) „Czemu? Ponieważ nie pozwalasz nam się rozwijać. Używasz nas jak instrumentów, nie partnerów. A nasza radość z muzyki, itp., itd….” Więc musiał zrezygnować. Czy to nie miłe? (Śmiech) Jest miłym gościem. Jest naprawdę miłym gościem. Cóż, czy da się to zrobić bez tak silnej kontroli, albo z innym rodzajem kontroli? Spójrzmy na następnego dyrygenta, Richarda Straussa.

07:26

(Muzyka)

07:54

Obawiam się, że macie wrażenie, że tak naprawdę wybrałem go, bo jest stary. To nieprawda. Kiedy był młodym człowiekiem, około trzydziestki, napisał coś co nazwał „Dziesięć przykazań dyrygenta”. Pierwsze brzmiało: Jeśli po koncercie jesteś spocony, to znaczy, że musiałeś zrobić coś źle. To jest pierwsze. Bardziej spodoba wam się czwarte. Brzmi: Nigdy nie patrz na puzonistów — to ich tylko ośmiela. (Śmiech)

08:21

Więc, cała idea to tak naprawdę pozwolić by wszystko samo się działo. Nie wtrącać się. Ale jak to się dzieje? Czy widzieliście jak przewraca strony partytury? Albo jest już zniedołężniały, i nie pamięta swojej własnej muzyki, bo to on napisał tę muzykę, albo tak naprawdę wysyła im bardzo silną wiadomość: „Panowie, musicie grać według nut. Tu nie chodzi o moją historię. Nie chodzi o waszą historię. To tylko wykonanie zapisanej muzyki, bez interpretowania.” Interpretacja to prawdziwa historia wykonawcy. Więc nie, tego nie chce. To inny rodzaj kontroli. Obejrzyjmy innego super-dyrygenta, niemieckiego super-dyrygenta. Herbert von Karajan, proszę.

09:03

(Muzyka)

09:36

Co tu jest inaczej? Czy widzieliście jego oczy? Zamknięte. Czy widzieliście ręce? Widzieliście taki ruch? Pozwólcie mi dyrygować wami, dwa razy. Raz jak Muti, a wy — (Klaszcze) — klaśniecie, tylko raz. A potem jak Karajan. Zobaczmy, co się stanie. Ok? Jak Muti. Jesteście gotowi? Bo Muti… (Śmiech) Ok? Gotowi? Zróbmy to.

09:55

Publiczność: (Klaszcze)

09:56

Itay Talgam: Hmm… Jeszcze raz.

09:58

Publiczność: (Klaszcze) Itay Talgam: Dobrze. Teraz, jak Karajan. Skoro już jesteście wyszkoleni, pozwólcie mi się skoncentrować, zamknąć oczy.

10:07

Publiczność: (Klaszcze) (Śmiech)

10:09

Itay Talgam: Czemu nie wszyscy razem? (Śmiech) Bo nie wiedzieliście, kiedy grać. Teraz mogę wam powiedzieć, nawet Filharmonicy Berlińscy nie wiedzą kiedy grać. (Śmiech) Ale powiem wam, jak to robią. Bez cynizmu. To niemiecka orkiestra, tak? Patrzą na Karajana. A potem patrzą na siebie nawzajem. (Śmiech) „Rozumiecie, czego ten facet chce?” A po zrobieniu tego, naprawdę patrzą na siebie, i pierwsi muzycy orkiestry prowadzą cały zespół we wspólnej grze.

10:39

A kiedy Karajan jest o to pytany, faktycznie odpowiada „Tak, najgorsze, co mogę zrobić mojej orkiestrze, to dać im jasne instrukcje. Ponieważ to zniszczyłoby wspólnotę, słuchanie siebie nawzajem, które jest niezbędne w orkiestrze.” I to jest wspaniałe. A co z oczami? Czemu oczy są zamknięte? Jest taka wspaniała historia o Karajanie dyrygującym w Londynie. Wskazuje na flecistę o tak. Facet nie ma pojęcia, co robić. (Śmiech) „Maestro, z całym szacunkiem, kiedy mam zacząć?” Jak myślicie, jaka była odpowiedź Karajana? Kiedy powinienem zacząć? O tak. Powiedział: „Zacznij, kiedy nie będziesz mógł tego dłużej znieść.” (Śmiech)

11:24

To znaczy, że wiesz, że nie masz prawa nic zmienić. To moja muzyka. Prawdziwa muzyka jest tylko w głowie Karajana. I musicie zgadywać moje myśli. Więc jesteście pod olbrzymią presją, ponieważ nie daję wam wskazówek a mimo to, musicie czytać mi w myślach. Więc to inny rodzaj, bardzo duchowej, ale mimo to bardzo ścisłej kontroli. Czy można zrobić to inaczej? Oczywiście, że można. Wróćmy do pierwszego dyrygenta, którego widzieliśmy, nazywa się Carlos Kleiber. Następny film, proszę.

11:53

(Muzyka)

12:49

(Śmiech) Tak. Cóż, to jest inne. Ale czy nie jest to kontrolowanie w taki sam sposób? Nie, to nie to. Ponieważ on nie mówi im, co mają robić. Kiedy robi tak, to nie znaczy „Weź swojego Stradivariusa i, jak Jimi Hendrix, rozbij go o podłogę.” To nie to. Mówi: „To jest gest muzyki. Otwieram dla was przestrzeń, żeby stworzyć kolejną warstwę interpretacji.” To inna historia.

13:14

Ale jak to naprawdę działa, skoro nie daje im instrukcji? To jak jazda rollercoasterem. Nie dają Ci żadnych instrukcji, ale siły samego procesu trzymają Cię w miejscu. To właśnie to, co on robi. Co interesujące, to oczywiście to, że ten rollercoaster naprawdę nie istnieje. To nie jest coś materialnego. To dzieje się w głowach muzyków.

13:34

I to właśnie czyni z nich partnerów. Masz plan w swojej głowie. Wiesz, co robić, nawet jeśli Kleiber Tobą nie dyryguje. Ale tu i tam i to. Wiesz co robić. Stajesz się partnerem w budowaniu tego rollercoastera, tak, z dźwiękiem, jak tylko faktycznie wsiądziesz na przejażdżke. To jest bardzo ekscytujące dla tych muzyków. Muszą potem jechać do sanatorium na dwa tygodnie. (Śmiech) To bardzo męczące, prawda? Ale to najlepszy sposób tworzenia muzyki, właśnie tak.

14:04

Ale oczywiście nie chodzi tylko o motywację i dawanie im fizycznej energii. Trzeba też być bardzo profesjonalnym. I spójrzcie na to jeszcze raz, Kleiber. Czy możemy szybko prosić o następny film? Zobaczycie co się stanie, kiedy ktoś popełni błąd.

14:20

(Muzyka) Znowu, widzicie ten piękny język ciała. (Muzyka) I teraz, mamy trębacza, który robi coś nie do końca tak, jak powinien. Kontynuujmy film. Patrzcie. Widzicie, drugi raz dla tego samego muzyka. (Śmiech) I teraz, trzeci raz dla tego samego muzyka. (Śmiech) „Poczekaj na mnie po koncercie mam dla Ciebie krótkie ostrzeżenie.” Wiecie, kiedy jest potrzebna, władza tam jest. To bardzo ważne. Ale władza nie wystarczy, żeby uczynić z ludzi waszych partnerów.

15:04

Obejrzyjmy kolejny film. Zobaczcie, co dzieje się tutaj. Możecie być zaskoczeni, widząc Kleibera jako tak hiperaktywnego. Dyryguje Mozarta. (Muzyka) Cała orkiestra gra. (Muzyka) Teraz, coś innego. (Muzyka) Widzicie? Jest tam w stu procentach, ale nie rozkazuje, nie mówi, co robić. Raczej, cieszy się tym, co robi solista. (Muzyka)

15:44

Teraz inne solo. Zobaczmy, co z tego wyłapiecie. (Muzyka) Spójrzcie na oczy. Ok, widzicie to? Po pierwsze, to rodzaj komplementu jaki wszyscy lubimy dostać. To nie opinia. To „Mmmm…” Tak, to pochodzi stąd. Więc, to dobra rzecz. A po drugie, tu chodzi o kontrolę, ale w bardzo charakterystyczny sposób. Kiedy Kleiber — widzieliście te oczy, uciekające stąd ? (Śpiew) Wiecie co się stało ? Grawitacja przestała działać.

16:24

Kleiber nie tylko tworzy proces, ale również warunki w świecie, w którym ten proces się odbywa. Znowu, oboista jest zupełnie niezależny, i dzięki temu szczęśliwy i dumny ze swojej pracy, twórczy i tak dalej. A poziom, na którym Kleiber go kontroluje, to zupełnie inny poziom. Więc kontrola nie musi być grą o sumie zerowej. Masz tę kontrolę. Masz te kontrolę. I wszystko co łączysz, w partnerstwie, daje najlepszą muzykę. Więc Kleiberowi chodzi o proces. Chodzi mu o warunki w świecie.

16:58

Ale aby stworzyć znaczenie, potrzebny jest proces i treść. Lenny Bernstein, mój osobisty mistrz, jako że był wspaniałym nauczycielem, Lenny Bernstein zawsze zaczynał od treści. Spójrzcie na to proszę.

17:13

(Muzyka)

18:12

Czy pamiętacie twarz Mutiego, na początku? Cóż, miał wspaniały wyraz twarzy, ale tylko jeden. (Śmiech) Czy widzieliście twarz Lenny’ego? Wiecie dlaczego? Ponieważ treścią tej muzyki jest ból. Grasz bolesny dźwięk. I patrzysz na Lenny’ego, a on cierpi. Ale nie w ten sposób, który sprawia że chcesz przestać. To cierpienie, jak to mówią, jest jak cieszenie się w Żydowski sposób. (Śmiech) Ale możecie zobaczyć muzykę w jego twarzy. Widzicie, że wyjął batutę z ręki. Nie ma już batuty. Teraz chodzi o Ciebie, muzyka, opowiadającego historię. I to jest teraz odwrotna rzecz. Ty opowiadasz historię, i Ty opowiadasz historię. I choćby na chwilę, to Ty opowiadasz historię, którą cała społeczność słucha. Bernstein właśnie to umożliwia. Czy to nie wspaniałe?

19:01

Teraz, kiedy zrobisz wszystkie te rzeczy o których mówiliśmy, razem, i może jeszcze jakieś inne, dochodzisz do tego wspaniałego punktu, robienia bez robienia. Myślę, że to jest najlepszy tytuł dla ostatniego video. Mój przyjaciel Peter mówił, „Kiedy coś kochasz, podziel się tym.” Więc, prosze.

19:21

(Muzyka)

20:25

(Oklaski)

 

6. Answers to TRUE/FALSE questions

True: 1, 5, 6,        False: 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10

Dodaj komentarz

Twój adres email nie zostanie opublikowany.